Resolutions Through Revolutions

Resolutions Through Revolutions

Welcome to English class! Just kidding. But I do want to share with you a little about language arts. Our topic of discussion today: resolutions and revolutions.

 

Happy New Year, friends! January is well under way. We have started again. I like celebrating the New Year; I always take time to reflect and clarify during that time. I’m not much for resolutions though. I never have been. It feels like too much pressure to me. The idea is that we set these rigid, radical goals that don’t lend themselves to sustainable change. We look at our lives, assess what needs adjusting, and for some reason on January 1st, we deem ourselves ready and able to create immediate change.

Except, people don’t work like that. Change is not quick, and it’s not easy. In fact, change is so hard that we’ve created a whole helping profession. The work of therapists and other mental health providers is based on the premise that meaningful change requires willingness, resources, support, grace, patience, and grit.

 

Through my reflection in this beginning of 2024, I stuck with the language of resolution and revolution. We create these resolutions at the same time of a revolution- specifically a revolution of our planet around the sun within our solar system.

 

Back to English class.

 

The word resolution is defined as: “a firm decision to do or not do” and “the quality of being resolute”. Resolute itself (a descriptor of a person or thing) is defined as: “admirably purposeful, determined, and unwavering”.

 

The word revolution is defined as: “a sudden, radical, or complete change” based in the word revolve, meaning:  “to treat as the most important point or element”.

 

Why am I writing about words and language and vague concepts related to New Year’s resolutions?

Resolution is the quality of being purposeful, and revolution is a sudden or complete change of the most important point or element.

 

The beginning of a new year is the perfect opportunity to reassess for yourself, what is the thing I revolve around in my day to day? What is the fixed point in my life which guides my thoughts and actions? For most of us it’s a set of values. Values such as family, stability, safety, connection, and the like.

 

Take a moment with yourself to wonder, does my life revolve around the things that are truly and deeply important to me? If the answer is yes, well done you, and if the answer is no, maybe it’s time to find some resolve. Perhaps take a step back to identify the qualifiers of a good life, and once you have, be resolute in your pursuit of that good life.

 

Rae Holliday, LMFT